August 23-30, 2014 – International Solidarity Week for Anarchist Prisoners – Call out for action and resistance

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In summer 2013 members of several ABC groups discussed the necessity of introducing an International Day for Anarchist Prisoners. Given there are already established dates for Political Prisoners Rights Day or Prison Justice Day, we found it important to emphasise the stories of our comrades as well. Many imprisoned anarchists will never be acknowledged as ‘political prisoners’ by formal human-rights organisations, because their sense of social justice is strictly limited to the capitalist laws which are designed to defend the State and prevent any real social change. At the same time, even within our individual communities, we know so little about the repression that exists in other countries, to say nothing of the names and cases involving many of our incarcerated comrades.

This is why we have decided to introduce an annual Week for Anarchist Prisoners on August 23-30. We chose August 23 as a starting point, because on that very day in 1927 the Italian-American anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti were executed in prison. They were convicted of murdering two men during an armed robbery at a shoe factory in South Braintree, Massachusetts, United States. Their arrest was a part of a bigger anti-radical campaign led by the American government. The State’s evidence against the two was almost totally non-existent and many people still today believe that they were punished for their strong anarchist beliefs. Given the nature and diversity of anarchist groups around the globe, we have proposed a week of common action rather than a single campaign on a specific day making easier for groups to be able to organise an event within a longer target period. Therefore, we call on everyone to spread the information about the Week for Anarchist Prisoners among other groups and communities and think about organising event(s) in your city or town. The events can vary from info-evenings, screenings and benefit concerts to solidarity and direct actions. Let your imagination run free.

Till all are free.

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ABC Belarus
Brighton ABC
Bristol ABC
ABC Cardiff
ABC Czech Republic
ABC Finland
ABC Kiev
ABC Latvia
Leeds ABC
London ABC
ABC Mexico
ABC Moscow
Nizhny Novgorod antirepression group
ABC St.Petersburg

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Letter from Fallon, anarchist imprisoned in Mexico City

I want to begin this letter with a huge hug for all the compxs who are on the run, all those who are fighting for their liberty, and all those who are locked up and for whom this world of domination is trying to quell their rage. There is no cell, no wall, no authority to whom I give enough power to quiet my rage and my desire for liberty. I’ve had these feelings since I was a little one and now, in my heart and my head, they are stronger than ever, and there isn’t a day that goes by where I don’t think of you guys, my friends. I can imagine, and they tell me as well, that the situation outside is very precarious. This doesn’t surprise me, as us deciding to be in conflict comes with repression. It isn’t simple, it isn’t easy, and there are many emotions that are all mixed up, but the specific emotion that we all have in common is our force; individually and collectively. No-one can cage this feeling—neither a prison nor a border. Friends, I am thinking of you all with much love, especially Marc, who is locked up in a prison in Kingston, and I’m thinking of the compxs from the Che who were tortured by the comite Cerezo, of the cumbia ballerina, and of Tripa, Amélie and Carlos. Let’s stay strong, regardless of the distance!

I feel a little weird writing a letter without any specific destination, I have the feeling that I’m writing to a galaxy that seems a little bit far away. I want to say one thing: I want to be clear that I am not writing this letter to retain support or to portray myself as the victim. My intention is to use the pen and paper to communicate with friends, and to share analysis.

I think that the situation of being imprisoned is a very special opportunity to get away from the ‘fetichisation’ of prison and to make it a reality in a contextual manner. Today, I am writing this letter from Santa Marta, but who knows what is next.

When we were arrested, January 5th 2014, to me, it was a bit of a joke, with the 7 cop cars blocking the street, it felt a bit like a scene from a play, and from this moment onwards, this feeling never left. Everybody has their role. I remember this moment, at 2 or 3 in the morning, when we were transported from the PGJ to the scientific centre for tests. We were three, in 3 different cars, with 2 cops on either side of us, and with a minimum of 10 cop cars with their lights flashing in the deserted streets of DF, and with the scientists who were still almost asleep when we arrived at the Centre. It was such a show; CSI Miami in Mexico.

And the Arraigo Centre, ouf!
This was the most theatrical thing I’ve lived through in my whole life. When we got there, the street had been closed off for our arrival. The men with their soap-opera muscles and machine guns were outside in the street, as well as inside the car with us. I couldn’t stop laughing—laughing at their authority that I don’t even have the smallest amount of respect for, laughing at the way they take themselves so seriously. “Ken and Barbie” with federal police uniforms. And the prisoners, who don’t have names but instead have the good luck of having a colour. Mine was orange. The worst was that the girls in my cell were taking on the roles of submission, of fear, and of authority between each other, so seriously, as if they were in an audition for a Hollywood movie.

Sorry to the people who think that I’m making everything seem absurd, but, this is the way it is! A joke, the playing of a role.

And here, in Santa Marta, there are many neighbourhoods from A to H, there is a ‘park’, apartments, and neighbours. There is a corner store, sex workers, drugs everywhere; there are people who reproduce the gender roles of ‘girls and boys’, and there are also tons of babies. There is a school, a doctor, a court. There are studies to classify us in Santa Marta, there is corruption, formal and informal power, schedules, and many emotions, many histories, lots of time to share together, rage, and definitely lots of cigarettes and coffee to share. If it isn’t already clear (here my spanish fails me a bit), but now, Santa Marta is my new city, ‘A’ is my new neighbourhood, 107 is my new apartment, and Amélie, my neighbour. For me, this is clearer than any theory.

And so, I end my letter.

A note:

First, I wrote this in spanish* because, it’s sometimes easier. So, I also want to give a big thanks to all those who do the translation, I will try to translate other letters into Français and English.

This is the first letter I’ve written in a long time because in the Arraigo centre it was very difficult; pens, like everything else, were prohibited!

For me, it was important to write this letter with a touch of humour and sarcasm, not because I want to minimise the impact that prisons can have on people, but to minimise the impact prison can have on me. What I tried to express, in simple spanish (I hope to one day master it) (I also hope it’s understandable), is that since my imprisonment, the elements that have had the most impact on me have been the game of roles and city-prison, prison-city. I won’t lie to you—it isn’t always easy, we are surrounded by barbed wire, but there is one thing I am certain of and it’s that freedom starts in our heads, regardless of where we find ourselves. In mine right now, there’s a lot of rage, a lot of force, and yes, despite everything, there is more freedom than ever.

Thanks to the friends who came to visit! To those who took our collect calls. To those who are organizing, despite the tensions. And to those who nurture the fire and who attack this rotten society RAGE AND ANARCHY!! (A)

And solidarity with Marc, the compxs from the Che, Tripa, the witch cumbia dancer, Amélie, and Carlos.

–Fallon

Santa Marta, Mexico, March 14, 2014

And Happy March 15! (A)

*The letter was originally written in both spanish and french.

To write to Amélie and Fallon:

Centro Feminil de Reinsercion social Santa Martha Acatilla
Amélie Trudeau / Fallon Rouiller
Calzada Ermita
Iztapalapa No 4037
Colonia Santa Martha Acatitla
Delagation Iztalpalapa
C.P. 09560

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3 Police Cars Smashed Outside of Olympia Justice Center (USA)

3 Police Cars Smashed Outside of Olympia Justice Center

On the night of December 16th, 3 police cruisers parked outside of Olympia’s Creighton Justice Center (home of the Olympia municipal jail and municipal court) had windows smashed out.

This particular day was picked in conjunction with the international call for solidarity with the Barcelona 5, accused of the bomb attack against the Roman-Catholic cathedral in Zaragoza, Spain. Two, who remain in pre-trial custody, Monica Caballero and Francisco Solar, were also recently the targets of prosecution in the Chilean Anarchist Bombs Case (2010-2012). They both confronted that trial and 9 months of incarceration with dignity. They inspired the international anarchist community and so now we want to show our support for them and our hatred of the repressive forces with this act of rebellion. Solidarity means attack!

The Olympia Police are a manifestation of the same apparatus of repression that tries to control our comrades overseas. This control and repression exists in the US in abundance as well. For example, on November 19th in Durham, North Carolina, the police brutally murdered 17-year-old Chuey Huerta while he was being detained in the back seat of their cruiser. With our action we also send a heartfelt message of solidarity to all those who are suffering the loss of a loved one at the hands of the police, particularly those in Durham, NC.

The only thing in the back of these cruisers tonight will be the shattered egos of the OPD, to whom we send a big FUCK YOU!

Solidarity To All Imprisoned Comrades

Video

When you can not stand it any more to silently watch the destruction taking place around you, when you make the decision that you will not be a slave of the system but a opponent, when you pass from apathy to attack…
Then the cops, the Judges and the Media will talk of you as an terrorists
Because that’ is how they call the revolutionary in the language of the lackeys
For us they are the terrorists, their institutions, their democracy and their economy.
We Stand beside the imprisoned anarchist militants
Together we fight for a society of freedom and equality and the road to it passes over the debris of every prison.
Srentgh to Kostas Sakkas, who is in hunger strike since 4/6/2013

Political Prisoner Birthday Poster For June 2013

Hello Friends and Comrades,

1) Here is the political prisoner birthday poster for June. As always, please post this poster publicly and/or use it to start a card writing night of your own.

2) Mutulu Shakur had a stroke at the end of February and is having trouble obtaining the follow-up medical care that he needs. Please call the warden at Victorville and ask that Mutulu receive the medical care that he needs. More info here.

Phone 760-530-5000

Fax 760530-5103

3) Please send Rebecca Rubin a letter or note of encouragement, being transferred can be quite jarring. (Remember not to write to her about her case at all because she is pre-trial.)Rebecca is accused of being a member of the Earth Liberation Front. She is facing charges of arson and conspiracy for actions that occurred between 1996 and 2001.

Her new address is as follows:
Rebecca Rubin #2013001108
Columbia County Jail
901 Port Ave.
St. Helens, OR 97051

4) Anarchist Gerald Koch has been imprisoned for an indefinite amount of time for refusing to testify in front of a grand jury. Please send him a letter or note of support. More info here.

Gerald Koch
68631-054
MDC Brooklyn
PO Box 329002
Brooklyn, NY 11232

5) Jeremy Hammond plead guilty to being involved in the Stratfor Leak. You can read his statement here. Please send him a letter or note of support.

Jeremy Hammond
18729-424 Metropolitan Correctional Center
150 Park Row
New York, New York 10007

6) We just received news from Jorge Cornell that their (J., Peaceful, and Ernesto’s) motion for re-trial was denied by Judge Beaty, who released a twelve page response to the defendants’ request. J. was told by his lawyer that it is entirely possible that the sentencing hearing may not even get scheduled until August. There are more updates on what’s going on with the North Carolina Latin Kings’ RICO trial here.

7) Lastly, here is a link to the latest Political Prisoner/Prisoner Of War every-other week update by the NYC-Anarchist Black Cross. There are lots of good updates on many political prisoners.

Until Every Cage Is Empty,

The Chapel Hill Prison Books Collective

June 11th International Day of Solidarity With Marie Mason, Eric McDavid & Long Term Anarchist Prisoners

June 11th is the international day of solidarity with Eric McDavid, Marie
Mason, and other longterm anarchist prisoners. If you are planning on
doing an event for the day, please email us at june11[at]riseup[dot]net. You can find
resources, information about events from previous years, and word on
upcoming events at june11.org. Read on to see our thoughts on what it
means to do longterm solidarity, on how Eric and
Marie inspire us, and to learn how June 11th began.

The state stole Eric McDavid and Marie Mason from us in 2006 and 2008 respectively. In the years since their arrests, repression has come to feel less like a specific event and more like an inescapable, ongoing nightmare. Sentenced to 22 years and 20 years, respectively, Marie and Eric remain in cages to this day, and know this nightmare more intimately than most.

Lately, we hear lots of talk about the end times, and total environmental collapse seems imminent. But what do these forces mean to those inside prison cells?  And what do they mean for us on the outside? We are trying to save both each other and some shred of wildness on this earth.  Our task is difficult, and sometimes seems impossible, because the harder we fight, the more repression we face. Every day we lose more species, more land, more friends… and this process shows no signs of slowing. How do we survive and continue to struggle in the face of this reality?

If winning was our only goal, it would be easy to quit. But although we may fight to win, we also fight because, in this situation, to fight means to live. From the outside it’s easy to equate a prison sentence with the end of everything… but Marie and Eric are still fighting. With both our love for them and our hatred for their jailers intact, we fight alongside them.

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